Support Us
Buy Tickets

Performing in a double bill with Florian Weber's Criss Cross on Tuesday, October 10 at 9pm at the Bluewhale


marco cappelli - guitar | ken filiano - bass

Marco Cappelli and Ken FIliano will perform a set of original arrangements of Monk music


Presented with support from the
 Instituto Italiano di Cultura of Los Angeles


Marco Cappelli
 

Born in Naples – Italy, MARCO CAPPELLI studied classical guitar at the Conservatorio di S. Cecilia in Rome. Supported by a scholarship provided by the Italian Government, he studied with Oscar Ghiglia at the Musik Akademie der Stadt in BASEL – Switzerland,  concluding his Konzert-Diplom with a recital featuring a remarkable performance of Le Marteau Sans Maître by Pierre Boulez and Sonata op. 47 by Alberto Ginastera.

He has lead since the middle 90ies an extraordinary artistic path, becoming familiar with rigorous written music as well with free improvisation languages: nowadays Marco Cappelli works as contemporary music interpreter, as side musician for other artists’ projects, as well as composer and band leader and with his original music.

The diversity of Marco’s performances is due to a fascinating array of collaborations: Anthony Coleman, Michel Godard, Butch Morris, Franco Piersanti, Jim Pugliese, Enrico Rava, Marc Ribot, Adam Rudolph, Elliott Sharp, Giovanni Sollima, Markus Stockhausen, Cristina Zavalloni, Raiz… and many more.

http://marcocappelli.com/


Ken Filiano

Ken Filiano performs throughout the world, playing and recording with leading artists in jazz, spontaneous improvisation, classical, world/ethnic, and interdisciplinary performance, fusing the rich traditions of the double bass with his own seemingly limitless inventiveness. Ken’s solo bass CD, “subvenire” (NineWinds), received widespread critical praise. For this and numerous other recordings, Ken has been called a “creative virtuoso,” a “master of technique” … “a paradigm of that type of artist… who can play anything in any context and make it work, simply because he puts the music first and leaves peripheral considerations behind.”